Crazy Moos

Moosworthy Information Straight from the Dairy!

Shocking News: The Weather is Unpredictable

Corn Harvest 2011

It’s tragic, but things happen. Weather is very unpredictable, and is one of the many unpredictable factors we have to deal with here on the dairy farm. We have been busy harvesting this year’s corn crop. We have been working on it for the past couple of weeks, but now we had to stop because of the weather.

The weather has been pretty strange. We had a storm that came through last week, and it rained pretty hard. It was pretty windy too. So now we have to stop the harvest because the fields are too wet. We can’t drive the equipment in the fields because it’s too wet and things will get stuck. So we have to wait for the fields to dry up.

Unfortunately, we didn’t finish cutting the crop before the storm, and had a few more fields to go. Some of the corn blew over now.

It won’t be fun harvesting the crop now, and will take much longer to finish. Not fun. Hopefully things can dry out, and we can finish harvesting before it starts raining again. I got some interesting pictures.

IMG_0640ed

**Summers over, here’s the first mud puddle of the winter**

DSC02554

**We got most of the corn harvested, but not all**

DSC02553

**A field that we finished cutting**

California Corn Field

**What a corn field should look like**

DSC02546

**Our corn field now…**

IMG_0652

IMG_0645

IMG_0644

IMG_0650

IMG_0649

IMG_0654

Filed under: Dairy, Farm, , , , , ,

Growing Corn for the Cows to Eat

Chopping the Corn

**Chopping the corn**

Every year during the summer, here on the dairy we are busy growing corn for the cows. Corn would probably be the staple food of our dairy cows.

A lot of people today criticize animal agriculture for using corn. The argument being that with all the corn that cows consume, instead of feeding it to cows, we could use the corn to feed people instead. The argument seems to make sense at first, but when you look at the bigger picture, you find that they are forgetting something.

When we feed the corn to cows, we don’t just feed them the corn cob. We feed them the entire stalk (the whole plant). The entire corn plant is cut up, and put into a pile. The pile is packed by a large tractor that compresses the pile to eliminate oxygen from the pile. Oxygen = spoilage. The pile is covered, and it ferments so we have a feed source that is available all year around.

The cow is able to digest the entire corn stalk, something people cannot eat. So the cow actually is converting a product indigestible by people, into a high quality food product rich in protein.

Corn is a very environmentally friendly crop as well. Corn is like grass, but grows much taller. Because corn grows quite tall, you get a lot of food per acre of land. So compared to grass, we can grow more food per acre which uses less natural resources.

 California Corn Field

**A California corn field, not like the Midwest**

So we have been busy here on the dairy, chopping this year’s corn crop. I took some pictures around the ranch of what is going on. Before we started chopping, my sister checked the corn to make sure it was ready to chop. When harvesting the corn it’s important to make sure it’s ready!

 

Checking Corn

**My sister checking the corn**

Checking the Corn

**Very short compared to the corn**

Chopping Corn

**Loading the trucks**

Chopping the corn with Sunset

**It looks pretty cool with the sun in the background**

Chopping

**The corn chopper cuts up the stalks then shoots it into the trucks who haul it to the pile**

Corn Silage

**A pile of cut up corn**

Silage Pit

**The pile slowly growing**

Filed under: Farm, Farming, , , , , , ,

Ever Wonder How Cows are Milked

The course of human events can be interesting at times. Back in the days before we had the technology, cows were milked by hand 2 times per day. Then human ingenuity allowed for the development of modern day milking machines that milked cows automatically, and relieved thousands of people from milking cows.

Now technology is again revolutionizing our world. Thanks to technology you can once again milk cows by hand! So what technology once worked to eliminated, technology has now brought back. Isn’t it interesting how these things work out..🙂

I was pretty amazed last week to see that the number one app in the Apple app store was an simple app called “Milk the Cow.” The app claims that it is the top app in 20 different countries, and has enabled over 1 million people to milk cows in just one week. That’s a lot of milkers! **the only problem is that people are milking virtual cows… if only we could change that though**

IMG_0524  IMG_0525

**Virtual Teats**

The app is actually pretty amusing. You milk the virtual teat as fast as you can. The timer clocks how long it takes you to fill the pail. So far my fastest time is 15 seconds so I challenge anyone to beat that. I’ve had some real practice though so beware.

Since there seems to be such an interest in how cows are milked, I decided to share the process in pictures and a video. The process is fairly simple –> the cows enter the barn, the milking machines are attached, then the cows wait patiently while chew their cud, when the milking is finished, they happily head back home.

**See in less than 1 minute how cows are milked**

Cow

**On their way to the milk barn**

Walking in the barn

**Walking in the milk barn**

Cows Waiting

**Patiently awaiting while being milked**

Milking by Hand

**You can still milk them by hand**

Attaching the milk machine

**Attaching the machine**

Fresh milk

**Fresh milk**

Filed under: Dairy, Milk Quality, , , , , , ,

Billy, Wubbzy’s little Protégé

Wubbzy

**Wubbzy, full grown and one mean old bull**

So you might be wondering, whatever happened to Wow Wow Wubbzy, Wubbzy, Wubbzy Wow Wow, the smallest calf with the longest name. Wubbzy was actually quite the popular calf back in his prime, and even rose to celebrity status when the creator or the real Wow Wow Wubbzy show took notice last year.

Wow Wow Wubbzy was our farm pet, and he even went to the county fair. Even though he didn’t win at the fair, he was still immensely popular with everyone who visited him there.

These days Wubbzy has outgrown his cuteness, and is really quite mean. He is fully grown now, and very ferocious. I try to avoid his pen these days.

Wow Wow Wubbzy

**Did I mention mean.. Watch out!**

The good news is that there is another little Jersey bull that has taken attempted to take Wubbzy’s place. Billy is a little bull that my youngest sister has made her pet.

Billy

**Billy, he kind of looks like Wubbzy**

Billy was signed up to go to the fair this year, but he couldn’t go this year. Billy just had too much ringworm. It was really quite unfortunate. On the upside, Billy has gotten rid of his ringworm, and has healthy skin. He didn’t even need to use Proactive Solution😉

Wubbzy Wubbzy

**Billy, earlier this year. The gray patch is his ringworm**

**Having fun with Billy**

Unfortunately Billy will also grow-up, and that’s a fact will probably be the most difficult thing for my sister. In the meantime, she’s having a lot of fun with him while he grows to be as big and strong as Wow Wow Wubbzy.

Billy 1

**Billy, growing just as fast a Wubbzy did**

Filed under: Dairy, Dairy Pets, , , , , , ,

Everyone loves Pizza, is Pizza the New Chinese Food?

image

**Shopping district in Shanghai, China**

Ask anyone what their favorite food, and no doubt pizza will top their list as one of their favorite foods. According to ChaCha (a great source for information by the way), over 1 billion pizzas are delivered every year, and there are over 11.5 million pizzas sold every day.

Why do people like pizza though? When asked, one person replied this simple formula: cheap+easy+cheese= One happy pizza lover. Cheese seems to be a key element in any good pizza.

To put this to the test, one of the nation’s largest pizza chains recently made some interesting changes. In 2009, Domino’s Pizza actually reformulated their pizzas to improve their pizza recipe. The new Domino’s pizzas use higher quality ingredients with 40% more cheese. In addition, they added a few different types of cheese to their pizza cheese to increase the flavor of the pizzas.

The results were pretty amazing. By the end of the year their annual profits were up over 32% due to the large increase in sales. Keep in mind that this was at a time when consumers were holding back their spending due to the financial downturn.

Apparently, Americans aren’t the only ones who like pizza though. Bloomberg recently published an article about the growing demand for cheese overseas. Even though Asia has not been a traditional cheese consumer, people there have a growing a taste for cheese. Pizza Hut and McDonalds, no doubt, have help introduce cheese to these markets through pizza, and cheeseburgers.

image

**A universal language, show the logo to any taxi driver without needing to speak Chinese**

image

**Deep dish Pizza hut pizza, with silverware – not chopsticks!**

image

**In China, your soda comes with no ice, a lemon, and an awesome flexi straw**

If you visit Pizza Hut in China, it’s pretty different than the chain here in the U.S. In China, the Pizza Hut restaurants are full on sit down restaurants packed with people. From my experience, the restaurants attract the younger Chinese demographic who absolutely love pizza.

image

**Trendy Interior of a Pizza Hut in China**

According to the Bloomberg article, Pizza Hut sales in China are “on fire” with store sales jumping 22% in the second quarter of this year. With the middle class becoming wealthier, there are more people spending more on a Western-style diet. This has definitely helped propel an increase of U.S. dairy exports abroad.

Exports of cheese to Asia, have risen significantly over a year ago. In the 4 months ending in April 30, cheese exports from the U.S. increased 68% from a year earlier and exports in 2010 were a record 173,531 tons according to the Bloomberg article.

There is a lot of opportunity in the world as a dairy producer. We have been very blessed here in the U.S. for a developed industry that can provide us with the cheesy goodness on our pizza. Perhaps though, we can be a key player in future helping to provide others that same goodness.

Filed under: Cheese, Dairy, Dairy Issues, , , , , , ,

Interesting Facts about California Agriculture

IMG_0408

**A California Wheat Field**

California is famous for so many things: technology, Apple computers, beaches, surfing, movies, Hollywood. What many people don’t realize is that California affects their daily lives in a much more important way. Note:some people may beg to differ since it’s almost impossible to live without Facebook, or their iPhone…

California is one of the most productive places in the world in terms of food production, yet many of the people in California are unaware of the immense productivity of California farms. Many people pass farms here in California while driving down the road, without realizing that California is actually the breadbasket of the world.

Just to prove how important California agriculture is to the United States, I pulled together some fun and interesting facts. Some of these facts may surprise you

  • California is the world’s 5th largest supplier of food, cotton fiber and other agricultural commodities.
  • California is the largest producer of food in the U.S. yet has less than 4% of the farms in the U.S.
  • The unique Mediterranean climate allows us to grow over 450+ different crops.
  • Some of these crops are exclusive to California: almonds, artichokes, dates, figs, kiwifruit, olives, persimmons, pomegranates, pistachios, prunes, raisins, clovers, and walnuts
  • California is the largest exporter of almonds in the world
  • California is the number 1 dairy state in the U.S.
  • California produces over 86% of all the lemons consumed in the United States.
  • California is the 4th largest wine producer in the world and produces over 90% of the wine in the U.S.
  • 70 to 80% of all ripe olives are grown in California
  • California accounts for 94% of the processed tomatoes in the U.S.
  • California is the nation’s leading producer of strawberries, averaging 1.4 billion pounds of strawberries or 83% of the country’s total fresh and frozen strawberry production.
  • The value of the California strawberry crop is approximately $700 million with related employment of more than 48,000 people.
  • California produces 25% of the nation’s onions and 43% of the nation’s green onions.

The pictures in this posting were taken by me this month. You can see how much variety there is in farming just in these few pictures.

IMG_0438

**Beef cows grazing in Northern California**

IMG_0437

**A Rice Field **

IMG_0435

**An Olive Orchard**

IMG_0439

**Sunflowers**

IMG_0441

Filed under: Dairy, Farming, , , , , , , , , , ,

Milk is so Expensive… Really?

Pic

**Which is cheaper, consider the nutrient value**

When I ask people why they don’t drink very much milk, I often get a similar response – “Milk is just too expensive.” A lot of people say they drink more soda because it’s a much cheaper beverage. Milk is just too expensive for them to be regular dairy purchasers. I am always frustrated when people tell me this because many people don’t actually do a real comparison of the beverage choices they have. You have to remember that, you get what you pay for.

Milk is one of the most nutrient dense products you can buy at the store today. Milk is really a value buy at the store full of vitamins and nutrients, with a perfect balance of fat, carbohydrates, and protein. The protein in the milk alone makes it a great nutritional drink. You can get about 9 or 10 grams of protein per serving of milk. Many people forget about this though, I think because it’s just a point that the dairy industry hasn’t marketed enough. Sometimes people need to be reminded.

Do Some Fun Research

If you want to do some fun research about your beverage choices, go to the Why Milk website and compare milk to other beverage choices out there. I was pretty surprised by some of the results. They have some pretty nifty tools that you can play around with.

Milk nutrient comparison

**Milk has 9 nutrients while soda has zero! – Source: Why Milk**

 Milk vs Soda

**Milk nutrients vs. Soda nutrients – Source: Why Milk**

I went to the beverage analyzer tool and calculated the difference between milk and soda. I drink about 3 glasses of whole milk every day so I compared it to drinking a 32 oz. soda. The results were pretty interesting. The amount of calories between milk and soda was about the same. The real difference was that by drinking milk you can actually get a significant portion of the essential nutrients you need.

Drinking 3 glasses of milk per day, I got nearly half of the daily amount of protein I need! That means I don’t need to consume as much meat or other protein sources to fulfill my daily protein requirements. I also get over 80% of my daily calcium needs from milk. Milk is also low in sugar and carbohydrates because lactose is a natural low calorie sweetener.

Milk nutrients

**The nutritional value of 3 glasses of whole milk – Source: Why Milk**

Cut the Soda

If I drink a 32 oz. soda though, I consume a similar amount of calories as milk, except they are empty calories without any nutritional significance. Drinking soda, the only significant nutrition I get is a bunch sugar and carbohydrates.

One of the tools on the Why Milk web site showed the difference in the amount of nutrients in various beverages. When I compared milk to soda it showed that milk had 9 nutrients and soda had zero. So if you get 0 nutrients from soda, you have to make them up in other foods. So you have to spend money on other foods to get the same nutrition, you need more of other foods and spend more on other foods. So even though soda may seem cheaper on the shelf, it actually may be a more expensive beverage since it doesn’t contribute anything nutritionally to your diet.

Soda nutrients

**The nutritional value of a 32 oz. soda – Source: Why Milk**

Milk is a Nutrient Bargain Bin

Another tool showed that a glass of fat free milk is an extremely cheap source of nutrients costing $.25 in 2008. To get the same nutrition from other sources, you have to drink 1 glass of orange juice, 1 glass of vitamin water, a swig of an energy drink, ½ scoop of protein, and 6 glasses of soda. Adding these other sources together, you have a cost of $3.11!!

I think in earlier America, this was recognized far more than it is today. I think the proliferation of advertisements from other beverage companies have probably blocked some people from realizing this astounding truth. I found an interesting Journal article about the nutritional value of milk to society if you want to do some reading about this topic.

 Milk is a better value

**The value of nutrients in a glass of milk – Source: Why Milk**

The Challenge

I want to challenge everyone to truly consider their beverage choices and how it affects their nutrition. Call it the Crazy Moos challenge. I think a lot of people would feel much healthier if they consumed less soda, and drank more milk. Instead of chugging loads of sugar, try drinking more milk and actually drink something that can provide some nutritional value. Milk is a nutrient dense product so when you are purchasing food remember that. Once you consider the nutrient value of milk, you will see that it’s actually a much better deal!

Why Santa is Fat

**Ever wonder why Santa is fat, hint its not the milk and cookies..**

 

Filed under: Dairy Products, , , , , , , , , ,

Chase our Border Collie, an invaluable worker at the dairy

There is always a lot of work to do on the farm. So to help with all the work we got a new dog to help us herd the cows. Border collies are extremely intelligent dogs that really are born to herd animals. It’s in their DNA, and they can’t help but herd things around.

Ace

**Ace, training calves how to walk with the halter**

Our first border collie was named Ace and was probably one of the best dogs ever that we have had on our dairy. He never spent a lot of time lying around, but was continually searching for work to do on the dairy. He was very energetic!

He would disappear at night only to find out that he was busy helping the some of our employees herd the cows to the milk barn. During the day, he would help anyone herding cows or calves. Once he finished helping you though, he would listen to see if he could hear anyone else herding the animals and quickly rush off to help them. Ace definitely loved his job here at the dairy.

The great thing about Ace was that he was very gentle with the cows. He never rushed up to the cows, and tried to bite them. He herded the cows, but made sure that they were never under any sort of stress and that’s very important. Happy cows give more milk so we want them to be comfortable and stress free.

Border collies are great herders. If you live in the city where there is nothing for your border collie to herd, they will improvise because they have loads of energy to expend. They begin to herd cats, people, or anything that moves really. They have a lot of energy so it’s really quite unfortunate if they don’t have any opportunities to work. The Wall Street Journal had a great article and video about Border Collies a few months ago.

http://online.wsj.com/video/border-collies-born-to-herd/2EC6DD8E-F01A-4AC7-B14A-24BED2B047C9.html

Some people think that you can train any dog to herd animals, but you really can’t. Some dogs just cannot learn how to herd animals. I think it’s born into them, just like some people are better herdsman than others.

My uncle tried to train a German Sheppard to herd some of our young stock, but it really hasn’t worked. German Sheppard’s are just not born herders, they are watch dogs. When herding the cows, the dog just narrows his focus to one of the animals and pursues that one animal while neglecting the rest of the herd. As you can imagine this causes chaos and constant scolding’s from his master. The dog cannot help it though; it’s just not in the dog to herd animals. I don’t think there is anything you can do to change that, it’s just the nature of things.

Ace our Border collie was a pretty great cow dog though. Unfortunately one Sunday, someone picked him up and stole him. Apparently trained cow dogs are very valuable to some people. We keep hoping he will turn up.

Chase

**Chase, the new puppy**

Chase driving

**Chase ready for a tour of the dairy, a dog with many skills- he drives too**

So a few weeks ago, we got a new Border collie who we named Chase. We only hope that he is as good a dog as Ace was. Chase is still a puppy though so still learning to herd cows. We think he is coming along though. He already herds all of our cats around the house. Chase will be a great addition to the dairy and an invaluable worker to help us on the farm.

Chase 1

**Chase meets the cows**

Chase 2

**He meets the baby calves too. The Calf- “huh, what are you”**

Chase 3

**Enjoying a drink after his extensive tour of the dairy**

Filed under: Dairy, Dairy Pets, , , , , , ,

The Cows take a Field Trip

**The Herd**

Question – What do you do when you have a large portion of your herd escape their pen at 1am?

Do you:

a. Go back to bed, and deal with it in the morning

b. Panic, and run around with your arms flailing

c. Try to wake up, and go round them up

d. Wake up your brother, tell him to take care of it and go back to bed

I will admit I wanted to choose d. the other night, but unfortunately I’m too nice to do that. There were a series of tumultuous events that took place the other night that led to an inconvenient escape of a bunch of cows on the dairy. (of course it had to happen in the middle of the night)

Just kidding, there weren’t really any series of events, just a broken snap on the gate. Cows are extremely curious creatures, and when they found the gate open, they decided to go exploring. Naturally they moooed out to their friends about their finding, and went off into the dark.

Cows have a very strong herd mentality so they don’t stray randomly in all directions. So that definitely makes it easy to round them all up. They also don’t like straying too far from the lit up areas of the dairy. It’s almost like they are scared of the dark.

They wandered around the dairy for awhile. It was like they were on a sightseeing mission looking for interesting things to see. You could probably equate it to a fieldtrip, except for them it was a literal trip to the field.

It’s a good thing they aren’t hard to round up. In fact, they actually were all heading back towards their pen anyway. That’s where the food is.. So even though they enjoyed the freedom wandering around the dairy, they still preferred their comfortable home. The old saying goes, “there’s no place like home” and I think the cows would definitely agree with that.

Filed under: Dairy, Random, , , ,

Dairymen have Mercy for Animals!

California Calf

**Happy cows really do come from California. This little girl was out basking in the sunshine the other day just working on her tan**

Dairymen give Animals the Best Care Possible

Sometimes as a dairy farmer I am very distraught by the things people say about the dairy industry. We treat animals with respect and give them the best care possible. We depend on them for our livelihood, just as our animals depend on us. It’s a mutually beneficial relationship. That’s why it’s hard to listen to people bash us and our industry by saying negative things; condemning us for inhumane treatment of animals while the complete opposite is true.

Recently Mercy for Animals, an animal rights activist group, released some “undercover” video footage of a ranch not treating baby calves right. As a dairyman, I was completely appalled by the footage. I found it extremely disturbing, and it really motivated me to write about this.

I think that the “undercover” video footage that Mercy for Animals puts together is meant to disturb you. They stage these events in order to provoke you, to motivate you to take action. I will admit it is very motivating, because I was extremely disgusted with the video, and cannot bear to let this happen to other animals.

They stage these incidents of animal cruelty themselves in order to promote and push their agenda. Their agenda being that everyone should stop eating products produced by animals. They hate people involved in animal agriculture, and want to erase the industry from society altogether. Since they are a minority opinion though, they need to convince you that people on farms hate their animals and abuse them on a daily basis in order to convince you to take action and join their cause.

I think anyone who knows a local farmer, though, will know that animals are treated very humanely on the farm. I for one can confidently say though that no dairy farmers treat animals the way that Mercy for Animals would have you to believe. There is no motive, or reason for a dairy farmer to treat the animals on their farm inhumanely unless they are truly depraved people.

Dairymen are motivated to treat the baby calves on the dairy humanely because they are the next generation for the farm. Just like you want the best for your children, we want the best for our calves. We treat them well because happy cows really do produce the best milk.

On Our Farm

Let me tell you how we treat the baby calves. When the baby calves are born we put them in hutches so they can have a clean, safe, stress free environment. The reason we separate them from the mother is that the mothers can be very careless at times. The hutches are a safe place where they won’t get stepped on or pushed around by the older cows. If you want to think about it this way, the calf pens are basically big play pens, like a play pen you would keep your toddler in to keep them out of trouble.

IMG_0373

**The Playpens**

IMG_0368

The calves stay in the hutches for about 2 months, and then move into a much larger group pen where they can play with all their friends. During those first few weeks though it’s critical that they remain separated because their immune systems are still developing. Any illness at this point of their life will severely affect their growth so we try to keep them as healthy as possible. We use some basic antibiotics if they get sick, which helps them overcome any illness they might get.

IMG_0384 1

**My brother and sister out making sure everyone is healthy in the group pen the babies go to after they leave their playpens**

Calves are fed two times every day, morning and afternoon. They get a nice bucket full of milk so they can grow healthy and strong. In addition we have grain bins available in their pens so they have free access to grain whenever they want. Grain is high in protein so the baby calves can grow more quickly. In the summer time when it’s very hot, we also make sure to keep water available to them in addition to the milk they get. Sometimes on the extremely hot days, we give them electrolytes (Gatorade for calves) to keep them properly hydrated. So nutritionally they have a very healthy and sound diet and are always kept fed and well nourished.

The Plain, Simple Truth

It’s important to keep them healthy with a stress free environment and that’s really our primary goal in raising the babies. They are our farms next generation so we make sure to treat them well on our farm! I know for a fact that all other dairy farmers have this same motivation to treat their cows and calves humanely and keep them comfortable.

Mercy for Animals and other animal rights activists definitely have an agenda, which they will enact using any means possible. All I can say is that dairymen have no motivation to treat animals badly. In fact only the opposite is true, we have full motivation to treat animals well. The better care we give to the animals the better they will be at taking care of us, and that’s just the plain simple truth.

IMG_0366

Filed under: Calves, Cow Comfort, Dairy, Dairy Issues, , , , , ,

Categories

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 13 other followers

Moo Entries

August 2016
S M T W T F S
« Nov    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Crazy Moos

About Crazy Moos

Welcome to the Crazy Moos blog! Crazy Moos is a play on words, basically trying to create a fun environment (crazy) for dairy news (moos). The overall goal of this blog is to communicate “moosworthy information” (newsworthy information) about the dairy industry and important happening on the dairy farm. Hopefully this blog will help people learn about various aspects of the dairy industry and what happens on the dairy farm. Visit regularly for new blog postings!

About Me

I am a 3rd generation dairyman in California, and our dairy farm really is a reflection of the American dream. My grandfather came to America from Europe after World War II in search of greater opportunities, and a safer place to raise a family. He came to America with hardly anything except his exceptional appreciation for hard work. My grandpa after a few years was able to start his own dairy farm and start producing high quality, nutritious milk. In the 70’s, he moved the operation to a more remote area (our current location), and started growing the herd.

Today, I am actively taking part in the farms daily responsibilities. I’m well qualified to be in the dairy industry, and consider myself pretty knowledgeable about the dairy industry having just graduating college with a degrees in dairy science, and dairy processing.

Many people today believe that the dairy industry has been taken over by large corporate farms, but a recent study done shows that most dairies are family owned. In fact, 99% of dairy farms in California are family owned and operated. My whole family is involved on the dairy. My sisters are caretakers of the baby calves, and we guys take care of the cows. There are eight kids in our family, so the dairy is definitely a family affair!

Milk is one of the world’s most nutritious natural products. So many people today are forgetting that milk is filled with many different nutrients, all combined to work in synergy together to maximize the body’s absorption of these nutrients. It’s the perfect blend of nutrients, in nature’s most natural product.

Milk, it’s a natural product, that’s naturally good for you!

**All Pictures, unless specified otherwise, Copyright © 2011 Crazy Moos. All Rights Reserved**
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.